The Education Action Network

Taking Back America By Taking Back Our Schools

Lisa Fink 4-14-20 PACC 

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PARENTS BEWARE!

Now that schools are closed across the U.S. to slow the spread of COVID-19, families are adjusting to having school at home. Most students are using an online format for their at-home learning. While children may be at home, unfortunately they may not be safe from comprehensive sex education or CSE. In their relentless pursuit of our children’s hearts and minds, Planned Parenthood along with their partners, SIECUS (Sexuality Information and Education Council of the United States), Advocates for Youth and AMAZE, have created homeschool-style sex ed resources promoting comprehensive sex education online. They know if they can raise up the next generation in their radical ideology, they can transform the culture, which is their ultimate goal.

Amaze.org, a partner of International Planned Parenthood Federation (IPPF), describes itself as a digital platform that desires young people to be “supported and affirmed” and envisions a world in which “the adults in their lives communicate openly and honestly with them about puberty, reproduction, relationships, sex and sexuality.”

While honest communication is a worthy objective, what Amaze considers “honest sex education” is far from healthy or harmless. Amaze has launched an at-home sex ed video series on Facebook that teaches children that watching porn is normal. “Lots of people watch porn,” the narrator exclaims. “After all, it’s right there and it’s free. And anyway, many people are curious about this sex stuff.”

Studies have shown that porn is highly addictive and has negative and detrimental effects on the brain and behaviors of youth. The National Center on Sexual Exploitation (NCOSE) also observes children exposed to porn are inclined to engage in sex at younger ages, opening them up to higher risk of developing sexually transmitted diseases (STDs) and pregnancy.

Here is another reason for concern directly from SIECUS' own website. “Let’s be real,” writes SIECUS, “Not too many children grow up to use algebra in their daily adult lives. But they will certainly apply the knowledge and skills they (should) learn through sex ed.”

It is no surprise that SIECUS recommends AMAZE.org where kids can watch colorfully animated videos that promote Planned Parenthood, birth control, abortion and how to circumvent parental knowledge and consent.

Additional resources include Sex-Ed School which has a library of explicit videos like “Love is Love,” in which children learn about “self-love,” AKA masturbation. There are also videos here about consent, gender expression, and sexual orientation.

Perhaps you have heard of Advocates for Youth? They are the youth arm of Planned Parenthood who has recently launched At-Home Activism: Going the (Social) Distance for Sexual Health & Rights. Kids can connect with “youth activists” around the country and engage in programs from sex ed trivia games to “youth activists” teaching about reproductive justice & op-ed writing: “This is meant to be the youth-focused sexual health & rights extracurricular you always wanted.” Advocates for Youth is also pushing their infamous “3 Rs” CSE program online.

So, while schools may be closed and students may be learning remotely, they are not safe from SIECUS, Advocates for Youth, AMAZE, and Planned Parenthood’s agenda to sexualize your children for social change. It’s vital, now more than ever, that parents are aware of what their children are learning online. To assist parents with this task, The National Center for Sexual Exploitation has created a step-by-step guidance to ensure children are safe online during quarantine and beyond. We encourage you to stay safe, be healthy and beware!

Respectfully,

Lisa Fink, President

Protect Arizona Children Coalition

SOURCE: Release from PACC

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